How to cite item

Prospective study of quality of life after lung cancer resection

  
@article{ATM14735,
	author = {Kathleen G. Hopkins and Peter F. Ferson and Manisha R. Shende and Neil A. Christie and Matthew J. Schuchert and Arjun Pennathur},
	title = {Prospective study of quality of life after lung cancer resection},
	journal = {Annals of Translational Medicine},
	volume = {5},
	number = {10},
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {},
	abstract = {Background:  Surgical resection with curative-intent remains the gold standard for clinically operable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This goal can be accomplished using a minimally invasive option, e.g., video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) or standard thoracotomy. Surgical techniques continue to evolve and few studies have compared the QOL of patients managed with these procedures using current approaches. The primary goal of this study was to investigate differences between patients managed surgically via VATS compared to thoracotomy with respect to ratings of chronic pain, anxiety/depression and quality of life (QOL). The secondary goal was to investigate differences between patients converted from VATS to thoracotomy versus those managed with the originally with thoracotomy. 
Methods:  We conducted a prospective cross sectional design study comparing the QOL after surgical resection of NSCLC. Data were obtained between 3–12 months postoperatively, from patients with potentially resectable stage I–IIIa NSCLC, who underwent a thoracotomy or VATS resection. All patients were consented. Pain was evaluated with a 0 to 10 numeric pain assessment scale (NAS), mood with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (mood disorders) and QOL with FACT-L (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung). 
Results:  A total of 97 patients with stage I–IIIa lung cancer were enrolled; of these 66 (68%) underwent a standard thoracotomy and 31 (32%) underwent VATS resection. The preferred surgical approach was a thoracotomy for patients with stage IIIa lung cancer, or patients requiring a pneumonectomy or a bi-lobectomy. There were no significant differences between VATS and thoracotomy patients in ratings of chronic pain, mood disorders, or QOL. Conversion from VATS to thoracotomy occurred in 22 (23%) of patients. There were no significant differences between VATS conversion to thoracotomy and those with initial thoracotomy procedures in ratings of chronic pain, mood disorders, or QOL. Conversion from VATS to standard thoracotomy occurred more commonly early in the series. 
Conclusions:  While previous studies have shown that VATS offers an early advantage with regards to perioperative outcomes, our study demonstrated that VATS and thoracotomy patients had similar late QOL outcomes.},
	issn = {2305-5847},	url = {https://atm.amegroups.com/article/view/14735}
}